National Weather Service
National Weather Service United States Department of Commerce

Flooding in Wyoming

On this page you learn what types of flooding are typical in Wyoming and how do you protect yourself, your family and your home. You will also find out more about significant Wyoming floods. Finally, you'll find links to NWS offices that provide forecast and safety information for Wyoming, as well as links to our partners who play a significant role in keeping you safe.

Flooding Navigation bar, hover for links Flood Safety Home Page Turn Around Don't Drown Interactive Flood Map Types of flodding and associated risks NWS flood products forecasts and observations (AHPS) flood safety education and outreach partner agencies National Water Center car sinking into snoy ground as land colapses under water
 
Significant Wyoming Floods
  • August 1, 1985 Cheyenne Flash Flood

    Fatalities: 12
    Injuries: not reported, but could have been be a fairly large number.
    Dollar damage: estimated at $65 million.

    car sinking into snoy ground as land colapses under water

    police car caught in flood waters 2011 Cheyenne flood

    Learn More:



  • July 15, 1896 Cheyenne Flood

    Fatalities: Many fatalities (exact number not known)
    Injuries: Likely many injuries, but not known
    Dollar damage: Dollar damage not known

    Learn More:



  • May 15, 1978

    Location: Rivers and streams in northern and central Wyoming
    Fatalities: None
    Injuries: Not known
    Dollar damage: $15.5 million

    Learn More:



  • May 14, 1984

    Location: Carbon County
    Fatalities: None
    Injuries: Not known
    Dollar damage: $5 million

    Learn More:



  • 2011 Flood

    Mid May-mid June 2010

    Location: much of Wyoming
    Fatalities: None
    Injuries: Not known
    Dollar damage: $5 million

    Learn More:



Flood Hazard Information
  • Flash Flooding

    Flash flooding is a rapid and extreme flow of high water into a normally dry area, or a rapid water level rise in a stream or creek above a predetermined flood level, beginning within six hours of the causative event (i.e., intense rainfall, dam failure, ice jam). More information...

  • River Flooding

    River flooding occurs when river levels rise and overflow their banks or the edges of their main channel and inundate areas that are normally dry. More information...
  • Burn Scars/Debris Flows

    Wildfires burn away the vegetation of an area, leaving behind bare ground that tends to repel water. When rain falls, it runs off a burn scar towards a low lying area, sometimes carrying branches, soil and other debris along with it. Without vegetation to hold the soil in place, flooding can produce mud and debris flows. More information...
  • Ice/Debris Jams

    A back-up of water into surrounding areas can occur when a river or stream is blocked by a build-up of ice or other debris. Debris Jam: A back-up of water into surrounding areas can occur when a river or stream is blocked by a build-up of debris. More information...
  • Snowmelt

    Flooding due to snowmelt most often occurs in the spring when rapidly warming temperatures quickly melt the snow. The water runs off the already saturated ground into nearby streams and rivers, causing them to rapidly rise and, in some cases, overflow their banks.More information...
  • Dry Wash

    When heavy rain falls over extremely dry land, the water rushes towards low-lying areas, which may include dried up canyon or river beds. This can quickly turn a dry channel into a raging river.More information...
  • Dam Breaks/Levee Failure

    A break or failure can occur with little to no warning. Most often they are caused by water overtopping the structure, excessive seepage through the surrounding ground, or a structural failure. More information...
Protect Life and Property NWS Forecast Offices and River Forecast Centers (RFC) Covering Wyoming
NWS Wichita, KS, link